Cider Review: Bulmers Pear

A few days ago, I tried Bulmers Original cider. It was adequate, but light on flavour. So it’s with a mixture of curiosity and disinterest that I turn my attention to my first pear cider: Bulmers Pear.

Bulmers Pear bottle

The bottle is almost identical to that of Bulmers Original, only with green instead of gold. And with the word “pear” instead of “original”. I think it looks fairly attractive. But does green equal pear? My first thought was it was lime cider.

All the usual details are there on front label.

Bulmers Pear front label

The HP Bulmer signature. The established date of 1887. The news that this is a “select vat matured” “premium quality cider”. A couple of silhouette pears are the main indication that this isn’t a regular cider, but part of the growing trend for flavoured ciders.

The back label is much the same as that from Original too.

Bulmers Pear back label

The description takes the usual marketing route. No prizes for originality with descriptions of fine ingredients and premium quality. But at least the description that this has a “natural, refreshing taste and smooth character” gives us some clue about what to expect. Albeit a vague one.

The main part of the back label is a big box talking about units of alcohol. For the five people out there who are interested, this 1-pint (568 millilitre) bottle of 4.5% volume cider contains 2.6 UK units of alcohol. The rest of the small print has things like their Hereford postal address, Careline telephone number and email address (consumercare@bulmers.com). Lastly, like all ciders, the only ingredients they mention are sulphites. Which, apparently, have something to do with freshness.

Is pear cider worth the hype? Is it a fad? And is it any good? Time to find out.

Bulmers Pear poured into a glass

After last time when there wasn’t enough room in the glass for ice and the cider, I’ve given the ice a miss this time. Despite the recommendation on the bottle to “serve over ice”.

The colour is no different to non-pear cider. Or indeed many other ciders I’ve seen. Although it is lighter in it’s shade of yellow than some of the less natural ciders out there.

The smell is mostly of apples. But the character of the smell holds something else. Something that could be pear. It’s hard to know either way, since the smell isn’t very strong.

A couple of gulps in, and I’m wandering where the pears are. I’m tasting mostly the same light flavour of apples that Bulmers Original had. A few more gulps and sips in, and I am finally detecting something different. The after taste is of pears. Yes, they are in there. I think. If it didn’t say “pear” on the bottle, I would be struggling to identify what it was. Bulmers Pear then, has a lightly apple-y taste and an even lighter taste of pears in the after taste. And that gives it a slightly different character to normal cider. Although you’re left in no doubt what you’re drinking.

What do I like about Bulmers Pear? Well, the blend of flavours compliment each other rather then clashing. Both are light and inoffensive, making it very easy to drink. And it’s not dry, making it drinkable on it’s own and for the casual cider drinkers out there. Myself included. With some ice, this could be a very refreshing drink too.

What don’t I like about it? The flavours. They’re just too weak for my liking. I like a drink to take chances with strong and unusual flavours. Then there’s originality. Bulmers may have been one of the pioneers of pear cider, but with everyone jumping on the band wagon, I’m not sure what separates this from the pack. I’ll have to try more of them to figure that one out. Lastly, it’s rather on the gassy side.

What is Bulmers Pear cider all about? And how can I sum it up? Think of it as an alcoholic, fizzy fruit drink. Lightly flavoured, and easy to drink it’s one for summer occasions. I simply found it less than interesting. You can barely taste the pear. And every flavour in there is weak. There’s nothing shockingly bad about pear cider. It’s just less fun than it could be.

Rating: 2.35

Have you tried Bulmers Pear? Or any other pear or fruit cider?
What did you think?
Leave your opinions, thoughts, ideas, recommendations and suggestions here please.

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14 Responses to “Cider Review: Bulmers Pear”

  1. Mike Baker Says:

    I found it far too sweet. Like drinking carbonated water with loads of sugar. No discernable pear flavour that I could find

  2. Mike Wilson Says:

    I found it to be sweet, which is a great thing since my wife only likes the sweeter alcoholic drinks so Bullmer’s Pear gets some extra fridge space.

    It’s quite light and although I can taste the pear I would have to be told it was a pear since it does taste like a standard apple cider.

    It’s not sharp or bitter but very sweet and refreshing. It doens’t cost a lot either; sainsburies will do 3 bottles for ~£5.

  3. MB Says:

    i tried this in london and it’s now my most fave drink. too bad i live in america and haven’t been able to find it. tried some organic pear cider and it tasted nearly like regular cider. bulmers is nice and sweet (i liked it sweet), refreshing and wonderful over ice. but i have to be careful since it’s easy to just chuck it down like juice

  4. Paul L Says:

    Just tried it just this minute, it’s refreshing with ice, I’d say the ladies will be lapping it up this summer. My only worry is the lack of ingredients listed on the can, i’m wondering how much sugar they put into this stuff to give it that sweet pear taste.

  5. jim Says:

    what a wonderful light and fruity drink. No problem with heavy stomach to get the same effect. come on the pear

  6. s p Says:

    I liked this very much!!

  7. Ann Says:

    I need to know if there is apple in pear cider since I have an intolerance to apples.

  8. david curry Says:

    I have upset stomack even if I drink only one bottle of this product.
    Information suggests that the INDEPENDANT NEWPAPER.ie reported on a fault in the production and persons have been ill from same. Is this true.?
    Have there been such reports? what form does the illness take?

  9. Rudi Says:

    This was one of the first ciders I tired and even then I was underwhelmed – very slight and watery. If you want pear cider go to Gaymers, it’s an entirely different animal.

  10. niall Says:

    Over the last few years Pear cider has taken a big spot on drink shelfs( were do all the Pears come from)??? strange!!! not all from the UK i bet………..so they should put country of orgin………………………Best for me ..the one from jersey..niall.

  11. Anonymous Says:

    It’s not even cider, its perry.

  12. Mike Says:

    Made me shit like a fucking horse! Awful stuff

  13. klausannika Says:

    Bulmers Pear was one of my first drinks and years later,I still love it. I know it’s not the best one around and all, but I am biased!

  14. cadogan west Says:

    There is a noticeable difference between Bulmers and Magners Pear cider. Bulmers has a golden colour, while Magners is much paler, like Prosecco. I suspect both are made using concentrates and gassed up with CO2, Bulmers has a distinct background apple tang so I guess they have bunged in some apple concentrate into it, this would also explain the colour difference. Magners tastes much drier and gives me heartburn, I suspect a pH test would make it more acidic. Years ago I had a job interview at Taunton cider, the interview bloke told me then they use apple concentrate from Hungary! Bulmers is now owned by a brewing giant Heiniken so I guess traditional methods have gone for a Burton. All these 7 apple varieties is pure marketing bollox. Real cider does not have any fizz and has no sulphite etc.

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